Tag Archives: mitre saw stand

Making a Mobile Mitre Saw Stand (Part 2)

The previous weekend I’d finished with the stand having a frame, top and bottom. I’d always planned for this to have wheels to the next step was to put them on. Having learnt my lesson about placement when I totally screwed up the casters on the drill press stand I carefully marked the location so the holes wouldn’t end up trying to share the same space as the frame uprights!

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What I hadn’t learnt yet was that nails into MDF just don’t work. I flipped the stand over and the entire bottom just fell off. A slight detour to drive screws in solve the issue and then I was able to finish adding the wheels. Then I gave the parts that would be visible a coat of linseed oil to seal them. I didn’t do the bottom or back panels but may do those later on if I get time.

I also realised that there was a lot of spare height so added a frame and a shelf giving me somewhere to put cut pieces or my safety gear when not in use.

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The next step was to line up and mount the actual saw to the stand. I set the depth so it can comfortably sit against the wall and used the fence line as a guide for making sure it was straight. I underdrilled the holes to begin with so had to fix that before I could bolt it in place with washers on either side.

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I knew before I added the shelf that my shop vacuum wouldn’t fit unless I took the wheels and the posts they were on from off the bottom so did that using my trusty portable bench and a cutoff wheel in my Dremel.

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Once this was done I put the vac into place and clamped my support stands to the side to see how things would look when it’s completed. The plan is to mount them properly to the sides so they are always there if needed but in a way that I can lift them off for longer cuts.

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I locked the brake on two of the wheels and did some test cuts. It’s nice and stable and exactly the right height for me since I actually remembered to factor in the bottom panel and wheel height.

There’s still a little work left to do but I’m very happy with the result so far.

Making a Mobile Mitre Saw Stand (Part 1)

Back in 2011 just after I started woodworking I was driving back from the library and saw a sign for a garage sale.  In those days I thought I needed every tool that existed and so stopped in to see what they had. It was late in the afternoon and the seller was just packing up, but when I said I was looking for tools they showed me what was left.

I ended up walking away with an old GMC mitre saw for $20 and it’s been in constant use since that time. The problem is that it’s never had a proper home, instead being dumped onto whatever surface was clear when I needed to use it. I decided recently to change that as I’ve been trying to get the workshop more organised and thought a combined stand for the saw and my old vacuum would be nice.

The stand I made for my drill press (in the back corner of the below photo) has held up really well so decided to use the same style for this one. I started with a piece of 1200mm x 450mm MDF from the local hardware store and placed the mitre saw on it to get a feel for how wide the stand should be. I decided that even though the saw is only around 400mm wide, I’d just halve the sheet and make the stand a little wider both for stability and to make the build easier. This also gives me some room underneath for more storage.

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The lengths of timber I’d bought for the sides of the frame were also 1200mm so I just marked the cut halfway after checking that they were actually the right length and not over or under.

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I’m finding blue masking tape very useful around the workshop for bundling parts together. This helps me to keep the cut pieces together until I’m ready to assemble and also to make sure they are all the same size. It also helps to stop me picking up one of them and thinking it’s spare stock and using it to cut another piece from – this has happened!

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Once I’d cut everything to size and bundled it together I was ready to start assembling

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I did a test fit of all the parts so I could make sure everything fit before I did anything else, just in case, but it all looked good.

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The MDF got cut to start with. I couldn’t be bothered setting up sawhorses for one cut so did it this way, which actually was a lot more stable than I expected and worked just fine

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I pre-drilled and countersunk everything to make assembly easier.

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Then I assembled and squared the side frames, using glue and screws to make it nice and solid

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Once the side frames were done it was easy to put the cross pieces in, using corner clamps to make it square as well.

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It was getting late in the day but I wanted to get the top and bottom in place before finishing up so just nailed them in place. The uprights are a bit thin but I plan to put a shelf in and a back on so this won’t be an issue when finished.

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Miter Saw stand on the cheap

I don’t know what it is about the miter saw. Every woodworker I know either loves it or hates it, with few in between.

Personally, I really do like it. A few weeks ago when I thought it had gone to that great big toolbox in the sky I was ready within days to put myself back out there and try and find a new workshop companion.

Thankfully the ER was able to bring my old friend back to life, and instead of flowers while it sat in recovery I made it a new stand.

My workshop is on the small side and shares the space with a large car, so the brief was simple

  • Compact
  • Folding
  • Cheap

I don’t want much do I?. I had a look at the pre-built stands at the local hardware store and while they are great and meet criteria #2, they pretty much miss the mark on the others. They did get me thinking though, what about mounting it on a sawhorse?

I didn’t want to tie up one of the ones I got for Christmas permanently, so went looking for a new pair. As luck would have it there was an ex-display horse separated from it’s partner for $10 in the clearout area so it came home with me.

Attaching the saw was much easier than I thought, on closer inspection it has notches to fit over a sawhorse and holes to be screwed down. A couple of scraps added either side to support longer pieces and I was done, for about an hours work including the shopping trip and $15 worth of material.

It folds up neatly so it can be stacked against a wall when not in use, and takes only a few seconds to assemble. Criteria met!

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